Common Conditions

Migraine Headache

The Migraine Headache ranks second in the most common type of headache. Many people attribute any type of recurring severe headache to Migraine, regardless of whether or not they have been diagnosed with Migraine Headaches.

Symptoms include moderate to severe pain, sensitivity to light, noises or odors, blurred vision, nausea or vomiting, stomach upset, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, sensations of warm or cold, paleness, fatigue, dizziness, and can shift from one side to the other or encompass the whole head.

Tension Headache

Tension Headaches are the most common type of Primary Headache, characterized by pain that wraps around the head and causing pressure. These headaches are commonly caused by stress, as well as noises and bright lights. Most people experiencing Tension Headaches will notice increasing intensity with time as well as pain originating in the back of the head (Occipital region), moving to the front of the head. Other notable causes include interrupted sleep cycles and depression.

Cluster Headache

The Cluster Headache is often received in a cyclical fashion. Affecting men more frequently than women, these headaches will come in waves and display increasing intensity with each “cluster.” Pain is often felt behind the eyes and sinuses.

New Daily Persistent Headache (NDPH)

These headaches are chronic with a daily onset, and unremitting in nature. They usually manifest themselves at areas on both sides of the head (bilateral) and may be unremitting from onset or rapidly build up to continuous unremitting pain.

Intractable Migraines

Similar to chronic daily headache, Intractable Migraines are severe in nature and typically do not respond to conventional methods of treatment.

Occipital Neuralgia

Chronic pain in the upper neck, back of the head, and behind the eyes. Pain originates from the lesser and Greater Occipital Nerves in the back of the head and upper neck. This condition most often manifests itself in the form of chronic headaches in the back of the head and around or over the top of the head. The cause of this condition is attributed to damage of the Lesser and Greater Occipital Nerves and is commonly treated by nerve blocks, injections, or peripheral nerve stimulation.

Supraorbital Neuralgia

Much like Occipital Neuralgia, this condition is caused by damage or abnormal function of the Supraorbital Nerves, located just above each eye. Pain is localized to the lower forehead, but may include areas of the upper forehead and scalp. Chronic headaches are often a result of this condition, which can be treated by nerve blocks, injections, or peripheral nerve stimulation, among others.

Chronic Pain Syndromes

Chronic pain syndromes of the head and neck can result in severe chronic headaches. These headaches, which have underlying vascular or neurological causes, are often misdiagnosed as Tension, Cluster, or Migraine Headaches.

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD)

Also called Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), RSD is characterized by intense chronic pain that is not in proportion to the apparent injury which caused the disorder. Pain associated with RSD usually gets worse over time. Causes of RSD are unclear.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

Also called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), CRPS is characterized by intense chronic pain that is not in proportion to the apparent injury which caused the disorder. Pain associated with CRPS usually gets worse over time. Causes of CRPS are unclear.

Neuropathic Pain of the Head

Neuropathic Pain is a result of a disorder contained in the nervous system and is often chronic. Trigeminal Neuralgia, a type of Neuropathic Pain, has a sudden and intense onset, with sharp, shooting pain in areas of the head and neck. There are usually specific triggers for this type of pain. Patients are unable to perform simple everyday activities for fear of triggering the onset of pain.

Acute Headaches

Headache with a sudden, rapid onset with intense or severe pain. Often last a relatively short period of time, but can be frequent. Many types of headaches can be considered acute, based on their attributes and duration. Although short-lived, Acute Headaches can affect quality of life.

Pediatric Migraines
Migraine Headaches can affect children and adolescents, as well as adults. Before puberty, Migraines affect girls and boys equally. After puberty, women are about 67% more susceptible to Migraine Headaches. Pediatric Migraines often last longer than Migraines in adults and affect children on both sides of the head, whereas adults are often affected on one side.

Adolescent Migraines

Similar to Pediatric Migraines, Adolescents commonly experience Migraines lasting longer than adult Migraines. Adolescent Migraines are also experienced bilaterally.

Trigeminal Neuralgia
A type of Neuropathic pain, Trigeminal Neuralgia is a result of a disorder contained in the nervous system and is often chronic. It has a sudden and intense onset, with sharp, shooting pain in areas of the head and neck. There are usually specific triggers for this type of pain. Patients are unable to perform simple everyday activities for fear of triggering the onset of pain.